Author Topic: Astro Photography  (Read 10374 times)

Re: Astro Photography
Reply #30 on: August 29, 2013, 13:55:55 PM
Stacked shot. 15 light frames 5 dark.
 
Manual mode. F2.8. ISO 1600. 17mm. 20 second exposures. I couldn't be arsed working out the 400/17 so assumed it'd be close to, or slightly above 20 seconds for exposure before star trails. I also used a radio remote control to take the shots (I think if I do this again I'll hook up the tablet computer to the camera and use an app to just interval shoot).

I used deep sky stacker and the RAW files. Pretty much just loaded the light and dark frames and then just processed it as was. I then used Adobe CameraRaw to post process a tad to adjust contrast and colour a bit.

The stars are likely out of focus as I couldn't really tell whether it was in focus due to light. I also recalled something about you don't focus to the limits of the infinity distance, so I focused as far as I could, and then tweaked it back a fraction. Probably a mistake!

Thanks for the info, hopefully I'll give something similar a go next month, going to Sorrento next week so once I get back from there I'll start keeping an eye open for some nice clear nights and see what I can get.

One thing, by dark frames do you just mean a shot with the lens cap on to use as a reference shot to help get rid of the noise?

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Re: Astro Photography
Reply #31 on: August 29, 2013, 19:27:15 PM
Yeah, bang on. I alternated between around 5 dark and then the light set and then 5 dark again etc. Figured it'd be best to have the dark references at both ends of stacks etc.

Pretty sure that it's not the correct way of doing things, but at the level I am working at though, doing things textbook perfect etc probably is less important than just experimenting and getting the experience to see just what is actually happening!

Re: Astro Photography
Reply #32 on: September 02, 2013, 22:13:01 PM
Yeah, bang on. I alternated between around 5 dark and then the light set and then 5 dark again etc. Figured it'd be best to have the dark references at both ends of stacks etc.

Pretty sure that it's not the correct way of doing things, but at the level I am working at though, doing things textbook perfect etc probably is less important than just experimenting and getting the experience to see just what is actually happening!

I need to do the same, I can do star trails stuff fine but not star fields so I need to have a bit of an experiment and trying to get them right, not too bothered if its not perfect just as long as I can get something that's workable and looks decent.

Its still annoying however that to get some really good results I could do with a full frame body with some nice f2.8 lens, not gonna happen anytime soon doh.

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Re: Astro Photography
Reply #33 on: November 14, 2014, 15:38:57 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_d5SaY5bLQ

Canon PowerShot SX60 HS moon video. The zoom on this camera is ridiculous, although later it isn't pure optical.
Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 15:40:48 PM by Serious #187;

Re: Astro Photography
Reply #34 on: November 15, 2014, 16:30:13 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_d5SaY5bLQ

Canon PowerShot SX60 HS moon video. The zoom on this camera is ridiculous, although later it isn't pure optical.

next zoom test is on uranus

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